The benefits of regular teeth cleaning go beyond having a great smile and fewer cavities. It can help to save your gums and, according to recent research, may reduce the risk of other systemic problems and diseases. Although routine oral hygiene is something that is practiced by most individuals, the question of how to keep your teeth clean is one that I frequently hear from my patients. The following general teeth cleaning tips can help you to have the healthy smile that you want and will allow you to enjoy all of the other benefits that good oral hygiene offers.

Use Your Toothbrush Properly – Out of all of the teeth cleaning tools that you use, the toothbrush is by far the most powerful. When used properly, it can remove bacteria from the mouth and prevent the formation of plaque, which can destroy the enamel of your teeth. You should brush your teeth twice every day.

Use a soft bristle toothbrush that fits your mouth properly and hold it at a 45-degree angle in your mouth. Using gentle, short, back-and-forth strokes, brush the outer, inner and chewing surfaces of the teeth. The tip of the brush can be used to clean inside of your front teeth. Your tongue should also be brushed to remove bacteria and to keep your breath fresh. Replace your toothbrush every three months. Quality electric toothbrushes will also help you to do a better job.

Don’t Forget to Floss – An often overlooked part of keeping your teeth clean is flossing. You should floss once per day in order to dislodge material that may be between your teeth. Approximately 18 inches of floss should be used and wound around a finger on each hand. Gently move the floss between the teeth until it reaches the gum line, at which point you will curve it against one tooth and slide it out from between the teeth. Repeat the motion for the other tooth in line.

If you have tried these teeth cleaning tips and aren’t getting the results you expect, you may want to talk to an expert about your oral health. To make an appointment, fill out our contact form or call (573) 449-2311.

Resources:

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/news/20111116/getting-your-teeth-cleaned-may-help-your-heart